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Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

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sfpcc
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by sfpcc » Wed Mar 02, 2016 1:07 pm

NBC had a couple of good shows, but they were gone by 1980. The Rockford Files was over in 1980. The Wheel mysteries ended in 1977. Columbo ended in 1978, (but came back in 1989 on ABC.) The only other shows I can think of is SNL, (which imploded in 1980 after Lorne Michaels left) and The Tonight Show, (but both shows weren't prime time.)

I didn't know that NBC had the rights to the 1980 Olympics? (God that was a crappy year.)



JackAttack FM
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by JackAttack FM » Wed Mar 02, 2016 6:24 pm

rugratsonline wrote:
JackAttack FM wrote:There would be a long list of buyers for a network like NBC in 1980, who could have got it for a discount from RCA because of its lagging primetime. Potential buyers then could have included movie studios like Paramount (Gulf+Western), Universal (MCA) or Fox, conglomerates like GE, AT&T or ITT or a major advertiser like Protor & Gamble, Coca-Cola, GM or Dow. Even major station group owners like a Westinghouse or Metromedia could have been bidders.
Eventually, GE would get NBC by the mid-1980s, following its acquisition of RCA.

Paramount, Universal and Fox would have also eventually entered the broadcasting field themselves -- Paramount, with UPN (1995-2006); Universal, initially with WWOR from around 1987-1991, before merging with NBC in the 2000s; and Fox, which many of you already know the story of.

As for Westinghouse and Metromedia, there could have been some FCC-mandated selloffs in many markets, due to regulations regarding station ownership at the time. In the case of Metromedia, the selloffs would be in New York City (WNEW and WNBC), Los Angeles (KTTV and KNBC) and Washington (WTTG and WRC). For Group W, the only example I could think of off-hand was in Baltimore, where they owned WJZ, and that's only because it was in close proximity with WRC in Washington. These examples are only for the period around 1980 -- by 1983, Metromedia would acquire WFLD Chicago, where NBC has its O&O, WMAQ.

As for ITT -- they tried to acquire ABC during the 1970s, but failed in doing so.

As for AT&T -- considering the regulations at the time, I do not think the FCC would have permitted Ma Bell to own a network, especially as many networks at the time used its coaxial cable network to transmit from city to city.
What regulations would those be???

Using coaxial cable to distribute the broadcast networks was almost a thing of the past by 1980. Most stations had been getting the network feed off satellite since the 70’s. And almost any station that wasn’t yet was getting it off of a microwave relay. So, AT&T’s business of distributing the network feeds was coming to a close as the 80’s started.

And by the measure of AT&T owning the coaxial that networks were feed through, the FCC should have forced RCA to divest either the network or its satellites and TV and radio manufacturing business. Some good lawyer could’ve argued that RCA was much closer to a monopoly of the TV business then AT&T's cables and microwaves.

The attempted ITT purchase of ABC was in 1966 and it was turned into an anti-trust matter. For whatever reason ITT got a lot of bad press about its attempt to buy ABC. And ITT kinda screwed itself on the deal because the Justice department argued that ITT would use ABC News to slant stories. Which wasn’t unfounded since ITT had already confronted several other reporters about their negative coverage of ITT’s attempted purchase of ABC.

But, by the time the 80’s rolled around multi-national conglomerates had become much more “acceptable.” Which is how a gigantic conglomerate like GE, not too unlike ITT, which also had government contracts was allowed to purchase RCA with NBC just a few years into the 80’s. And GE also got to keep the TV set manufacturing and satellite businesses.

Almost all the rumoured potential buyers for networks back then would come to fruition in one way or another in the following 25 years...

NBC (RCA) bought in '86 by GE (conglomerate), then merged with Universal (movie studio).

ABC bought by large station owner CapCities in '85 and bought by Disney (movie studio) in '96.

Fox purchased the Metromedia stations and created the Fox network.

CBS bought by Westinghouse (station owner/conglomerate) and merged with Viacom (Paramount) a movie studio.

And it would go without saying that any station owner back in the 80's that bought a network would have had to divest some stations to come under the cap... i.e. the Cap Cities-ABC deal.
Last edited by JackAttack FM on Wed Mar 02, 2016 7:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Some Guy from Toledo
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by Some Guy from Toledo » Wed Mar 02, 2016 6:40 pm

JackAttack FM wrote:
rugratsonline wrote:
JackAttack FM wrote:There would be a long list of buyers for a network like NBC in 1980, who could have got it for a discount from RCA because of its lagging primetime. Potential buyers then could have included movie studios like Paramount (Gulf+Western), Universal (MCA) or Fox, conglomerates like GE, AT&T or ITT or a major advertiser like Protor & Gamble, Coca-Cola, GM or Dow. Even major station group owners like a Westinghouse or Metromedia could have been bidders.
Eventually, GE would get NBC by the mid-1980s, following its acquisition of RCA.

Paramount, Universal and Fox would have also eventually entered the broadcasting field themselves -- Paramount, with UPN (1995-2006); Universal, initially with WWOR from around 1987-1991, before merging with NBC in the 2000s; and Fox, which many of you already know the story of.

As for Westinghouse and Metromedia, there could have been some FCC-mandated selloffs in many markets, due to regulations regarding station ownership at the time. In the case of Metromedia, the selloffs would be in New York City (WNEW and WNBC), Los Angeles (KTTV and KNBC) and Washington (WTTG and WRC). For Group W, the only example I could think of off-hand was in Baltimore, where they owned WJZ, and that's only because it was in close proximity with WRC in Washington. These examples are only for the period around 1980 -- by 1983, Metromedia would acquire WFLD Chicago, where NBC has its O&O, WMAQ.

As for ITT -- they tried to acquire ABC during the 1970s, but failed in doing so.

As for AT&T -- considering the regulations at the time, I do not think the FCC would have permitted Ma Bell to own a network, especially as many networks at the time used its coaxial cable network to transmit from city to city.
What regulations would those be???

Using coaxial cable to distribute the broadcast networks was almost a thing of the past by 1980. Most stations had been getting the network feed off satellite since the 70’s. And almost any station that wasn’t yet was getting it off of a microwave relay. So, AT&T’s business of distributing the network feeds was coming to a close as the 80’s started.

And by the measure of AT&T owning the coaxial that networks were feed through, the FCC should have forced RCA to divest either the network or its satellites and TV and radio manufacturing business. Some good lawyer could’ve argued that RCA was much closer to a monopoly of the TV business then AT&T's cables and microwaves.

The ITT purchase of ABC was in 1966 and it was turned into an anti-trust matter. For whatever reason ITT got a lot of bad press about its attempt to buy ABC. And ITT kinds screwed itself on the deal because the Justice department argued that ITT would use ABC News to slant stories. Which wasn’t unfounded since ITT had already confronted several other reporters about their negative coverage of ITT’s attempted purchase of ABC.

But, by the time the 80’s rolled around multi-national conglomerates had become much more “acceptable.” Which is how a gigantic conglomerate like GE, not too unlike ITT, which also had government contracts was allowed to purchase RCA with NBC just a few years into the 80’s. And GE also got to keep the TV set manufacturing and satellite businesses.

Almost all the rumoured potential buyers for networks back then would come to fruition in one way or another in the following 25 years...

NBC (RCA) bought in '86 by GE (conglomerate), then merged with Universal (movie studio).

ABC bought by large station owner CapCities in '85 and bought by Disney (movie studio) in '96.

Fox purchased the Metromedia stations and created the Fox network.

CBS bought by Westinghouse (station owner/conglomerate) and merged with Viacom (Paramount) a movie studio.

And it would go without saying that any station owner back in the 80's that bought a network would have had to divest some stations to come under the cap... i.e. the Cap Cities-ABC deal.
Came full circle!



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rugratsonline
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by rugratsonline » Wed Mar 02, 2016 7:49 pm

JackAttack FM wrote:
rugratsonline wrote: As for Westinghouse and Metromedia, there could have been some FCC-mandated selloffs in many markets, due to regulations regarding station ownership at the time. In the case of Metromedia, the selloffs would be in New York City (WNEW and WNBC), Los Angeles (KTTV and KNBC) and Washington (WTTG and WRC). For Group W, the only example I could think of off-hand was in Baltimore, where they owned WJZ, and that's only because it was in close proximity with WRC in Washington. These examples are only for the period around 1980 -- by 1983, Metromedia would acquire WFLD Chicago, where NBC has its O&O, WMAQ.
What regulations would those be???
In that particular case, broadcasters couldn't own more than one TV station in the same city, or within a certain distance of an adjacent city. Such an example is WJBK Detroit and WTVG Toledo, which were both owned by Storer Broadcasting before restrictions on adjacent markets were established. When investment firm KKR acquired Storer in the mid-1980s, they were forced to sell off WTVG, as it was too close to Detroit and WJBK.



JackAttack FM
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by JackAttack FM » Wed Mar 02, 2016 8:19 pm

Jack wrote:
rugrats wrote:As for AT&T -- considering the regulations at the time, I do not think the FCC would have permitted Ma Bell to own a network, especially as many networks at the time used its coaxial cable network to transmit from city to city.
What regulations would those be???
I was asking about the "regulations at the time" preventing AT&T from buying a broadcast network.

I already addressed station ownership caps in the 80's with the example of the Cap Cities-ABC deal.



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mtburb
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by mtburb » Wed Mar 02, 2016 9:14 pm

rugratsonline wrote:In that particular case, broadcasters couldn't own more than one TV station in the same city, or within a certain distance of an adjacent city. Such an example is WJBK Detroit and WTVG Toledo, which were both owned by Storer Broadcasting before restrictions on adjacent markets were established. When investment firm KKR acquired Storer in the mid-1980s, they were forced to sell off WTVG, as it was too close to Detroit and WJBK.
Don't forget WJW in Cleveland, it was also in close proximity to WTVG.


My furthest DTV tropo: KDKA Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at 202 miles for three days in January 2017 and a night in September 2017 with only an Antennas Direct C2V!

Current setup: Antennas Direct C2Max (2018-present)

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Some Guy from Toledo
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by Some Guy from Toledo » Wed Mar 02, 2016 10:44 pm

mtburb wrote:
rugratsonline wrote:In that particular case, broadcasters couldn't own more than one TV station in the same city, or within a certain distance of an adjacent city. Such an example is WJBK Detroit and WTVG Toledo, which were both owned by Storer Broadcasting before restrictions on adjacent markets were established. When investment firm KKR acquired Storer in the mid-1980s, they were forced to sell off WTVG, as it was too close to Detroit and WJBK.
Don't forget WJW in Cleveland, it was also in close proximity to WTVG.
Storer practically got in pretty early on that.



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WOHO
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by WOHO » Thu Mar 03, 2016 2:29 pm

and 2 of the 4 Storer stations in our region ended-up being FOX stations (WJBK/WJW) and the other two eventually switching to ABC O&O (WJRT/WTVG).



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mtburb
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by mtburb » Thu Mar 03, 2016 4:31 pm

WOHO wrote:and 2 of the 4 Storer stations in our region ended-up being FOX stations (WJBK/WJW) and the other two eventually switching to ABC O&O (WJRT/WTVG).
Storer never owned WJRT. However, Storer did own two other stations that did become O&Os of networks other than Fox (KSND/NBC and WSBK/UPN, now a My Network affiliate owned by, ironically, CBS).


My furthest DTV tropo: KDKA Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at 202 miles for three days in January 2017 and a night in September 2017 with only an Antennas Direct C2V!

Current setup: Antennas Direct C2Max (2018-present)

CircleWXYZ
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Re: Detroit/Toledo Big Three schedule for 12/10/1980

Post by CircleWXYZ » Sat May 11, 2019 5:50 pm

NBC was a crappy network in the early 1980s. It was equivalent to the CW. It’s understandable that WDIV preempted 1-2 hours of NBC programming a day. WDIV was a station trying to rebuild itself, after years of mediocrity. Once NBC made its comeback in the 1984-85 season, WDIV cleared more NBC shows. It actually started in 1983-84



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