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And Who Thought This One Up?

A forum devoted to the Advertising Industry. A place not just to discuss the ads you see & hear, but also the business side of the industry.
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Calvert DeForest
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And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Calvert DeForest » Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:48 pm

Speaking as a Diabetic, I can honestly say that the commercial alone makes me never want to try this medication:



Side effects include bobbing around like a geeky idiot!

(and knocking off a perfectly good Earth, Wind & Fire track)
Happy ADVENT!

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Turkeytop
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Turkeytop » Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:50 pm

I've seen that one. The only thing that keeps me from reaching for the remote, is the dog. The dog is funny. The rest of the ad is just plain creepy.

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Plate Cap
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Plate Cap » Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:05 am

I thought the same thing when I first saw it last night......it is so blatantly "this is how you should be" that it could be a political ad for a liberal candidate. Bouncing around (i.e. exercise), preparing healthy food, etc.

It's all the same pablum designed to appeal to the mesmerized mouth-breathers staring at the TV. The crazy thing is the entire premise of these ads is to get the viewer to ask the doctor to prescribe the product....one has to have a level of intellect though, to determine if the product is proper for his malady, remember it long enough to blurt it out to the doctor, etc.

And, success in terms of getting a prescription written by a proper doctor nearly requires that the product is more less a fungible equivalent of everything else out there on the market. If it was truly a standout product, the doctor would already be writing it.
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kager
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by kager » Thu Nov 09, 2017 1:36 pm

It doesn't have to be good, or represent the product in a logical manner. It just has to stick in your mind when the time comes to discuss it with your Dr., and between the repetition and familiar background music, perhaps it does that well enough for the mfg.

As a T1 on the competing med, I can tell you that its nauseating 'Tresiba Raddy!' jingle-infused ad makes me ashamed to be using the product. IDK if the ad works, but the product does (for me).
"The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred."

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Vic Doucette
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Vic Doucette » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:46 pm

I'm sticking with Trulicity. It has worked well for me.
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Turkeytop
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Turkeytop » Thu Nov 09, 2017 5:08 pm

I can understand why the dog doesn't want to walk with him. He's embarrassed.

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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by kager » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:53 pm

Vic Doucette wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:46 pm
I'm sticking with Trulicity. It has worked well for me.
Glad to hear. That product's ads seem to be more along the lines of the traditional 'here's what it can do, who it's for, and 'here are the side effects'' type.

It's also only for T2's, where the options are seemingly more varied, there's more competition, and it appears to be where drug co's are concentrating their efforts. I see ads for D products all the time and get my hopes up, only to hear later in the ad that it's only for T2D.

For insulin-dependent T1's, seems like about the only ads are for the longer-acting products that are concentrated, allow for less strict injection times, and last longer once they're out of the fridge... like Toujeo and Tresiba.

Don't get me wrong - I'll take the incremental advances in the T1 products' abilities. It's their commercials I can do without.
"The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred."

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Vic Doucette
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Vic Doucette » Fri Nov 10, 2017 8:57 am

kager wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:53 pm
Vic Doucette wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:46 pm
I'm sticking with Trulicity. It has worked well for me.
Glad to hear. That product's ads seem to be more along the lines of the traditional 'here's what it can do, who it's for, and 'here are the side effects'' type.

It's also only for T2's, where the options are seemingly more varied, there's more competition, and it appears to be where drug co's are concentrating their efforts. I see ads for D products all the time and get my hopes up, only to hear later in the ad that it's only for T2D.

For insulin-dependent T1's, seems like about the only ads are for the longer-acting products that are concentrated, allow for less strict injection times, and last longer once they're out of the fridge... like Toujeo and Tresiba.

Don't get me wrong - I'll take the incremental advances in the T1 products' abilities. It's their commercials I can do without.

Mom was T1 from around the time I was born, always brittle and nearly impossible to control. Near the end of her life, they couldn't even keep her glucose levels straight in the nursing home or hospital.

One of my first chores as a kid was to boil the water to sterilize Mommy's needle so she could take her shot. No such thing as a disposable syringe in the early 1960s.

I bet I pulled her out of a couple hundred low blood sugar incidents. We were never allowed to run out of orange juice, since that could get her out quicker than anything else. I learned to spot the signs and how to react to them when I was just a tyke.

The scariest one happened when I was 7 or 8. We were driving somewhere in Detroit. I was in the back seat. I sensed that Mom was having a reaction, so I climbed into the front seat (no easy feat in my leg braces) and somehow got the car to the curb without hitting anything. I got her out of the car and looked around. Down at the end of the street was a drug store. I knew that drug stores had smart men called pharmacists working there. I thought if I could find one that he could help Mom.

I marched her down the street (she, of course, was only dimly aware of her surroundings at this point) and into the drug store. I got her to the pharmacy counter and told the man that Mommy was a diabetic and her blood sugar was low. He grabbed a bottle of Coke and forced her to drink it -- many diabetics get really belligerent when their blood sugar plummets and will resist help.

Two minutes later, she was fine.

On a side note, I bet the leaders of Big Pharma thank whatever gods they pray to every night for T2 diabetes. If you watch your diet and take the right amounts of the right drugs, you can live a normal life for decades. Just make sure to keep filling your prescriptions.

Good luck in your struggles.
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Y M Ionhere
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Y M Ionhere » Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:57 pm

I never understood the idea behind prescription medication commercials. Doctors usually know the medication better than Joe Blow watching commercials, and what the patient needs.
I dont even change my insulin dosage amounts without the doctor reccomending it first. I sure as Hell dont go in for my checkups and ask them if I should use a new insulin I saw on tv. If I needed it or I would benefit from it, they'll know and will prescribe it.
Really, whats the point of advertising a product on tv that you cant even buy without doctors prescriptions anyway?

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Turkeytop
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by Turkeytop » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:38 pm

I believe the U.S. is the only country in the world that allows direct to consumer advertising of prescription medicine. Saw an ad the other night with among all the fast talking disclaimers and warnings, they said "Do not give to children under six years old." That message needs to go to the Doctor, so he won't prescribe it for young children.

In The Bleachers
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Re: And Who Thought This One Up?

Post by In The Bleachers » Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:03 pm

Turkeytop wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:38 pm
I believe the U.S. is the only country in the world that allows direct to consumer advertising of prescription medicine. Saw an ad the other night with among all the fast talking disclaimers and warnings, they said "Do not give to children under six years old." That message needs to go to the Doctor, so he won't prescribe it for young children.
I'm fairly confident the doctor is well aware of that, and would never prescribe the drug to a young person.
The purpose of the warning is for the parents who don't have any sense.

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